Sep 25 2014

Bikers Ride for Sickle Cell Anemia

Saturday morning bikers gathered together in front of the Sickle Cell Anemia Headquarters to ride out for their annual fundraiser.
Sponsored by Charity Motorcycle Club of Pensacola, the sixth annual ride brought over 110+ bikers to Pensacola.
We try to make sure that people are made aware of the Sickle Cell Disease through our events each year,” said Walter Wallace.  “If we were to keep Sickle Cell in the forefront as we keep cancer, we would be closer to finding a cure.”  He said.
Sickle cell anemia (uh-NEE-me-uh) is the most common form of sickle cell disease (SCD). SCD is a serious disorder in which the body makes sickle-shaped red blood cells. “Sickle-shaped” means that the red blood cells are shaped like a crescent.
Normal red blood cells are disc-shaped and look like doughnuts without holes in the center. They move easily through your blood vessels. Red blood cells contain an iron-rich protein called hemoglobin (HEE-muh-glow-bin). This protein carries oxygen from the lungs to the rest of the body.
Sickle cells contain abnormal hemoglobin called sickle hemoglobin or hemoglobin S. Sickle hemoglobin causes the cells to develop a sickle, or crescent, shape.
Sickle cells are stiff and sticky. They tend to block blood flow in the blood vessels of the limbs and organs. Blocked blood flow can cause pain and organ damage. It can also raise the risk for infection.
Sickle cell anemia is an inherited, lifelong disease. People who have the disease are born with it. They inherit two genes for sickle hemoglobin—one from each parent.
People who inherit a sickle hemoglobin gene from one parent and a normal gene from the other parent have a condition called sickle cell trait.
Sickle cell trait is different than sickle cell anemia. People who have sickle cell trait don’t have the disease. Like people who have sickle cell anemia, people who have sickle cell trait can pass the sickle hemoglobin gene to their children.
This Friday the 26th at Shiloh P B Church there will be a musical extravaganza to continue to raise funds for the Sickle Cell Disease.

Comments

0 Comments